60 Ideas for Europe

The 60th celebration of the treaty of Lisbon should be an opportunity to make an evaluation regarding the EU policies & adherence to these policies, as well as regarding streamlining legislation.

Especially in the framework of environmental regulation, it becomes more & more obvious that while there is one EU policy, which is voted by Member States, those same Member State apply different policies at national level.

Similarly, with the huge amount of, for instance, environmental legislation, it should not be a surprise that policies are not consistent throughout legislative initiatives, leaving huge uncertainty & unclarity as to which process to follow.

All this does not create a secure economic climate for industry.

Europe is seen by the other regions as being a leader in environmental policy. This however should not come at the detriment of economic stability. There is an expectance that policies are adhered to – consistently & objectively – by those who set them in the first place, in order to create a sound economic environment where industry has a reliable framework to operate under.

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Comments

  1. Very nice comment. This is not only true for envionmental legislation but I agree it is particularly obvious in this field !

    I guess environmental protection is not the only motivation behind those diverging national regulations… When there is a disagreement between the member states and the EC, search for the diverging national interests !!

  2. one word: freeriding

    that is the problem you describe. Member states make decisions for the public good but contribute the least possible.

    What Europe really lacks is a powerful executive! But then again, is the commission suitable for that position? with too much power with legislative monopoly and not enough democratic checks and balances it may become too much of a dictatorship.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_goods_game

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